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2016 Garden Week

 

Lancaster County
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 •10:00am - 5:oopm


The Garden Club of the Northern Neck presents “Following Country Roads in Lancaster County” as part of the Garden Club of Virginia’s Historic Garden Week. Lancaster County, the southernmost county of the Northern Neck of Virginia, is a land of rivers, creeks, and coves, all feeding into the mighty Chesapeake Bay. The county’s heritage is rich in farming and water industries. Seldom in view, many lovely homes are tucked away among the woodlands or along meandering roads, surrounded by lush farmland, or nestled near the water’s edge. The 2016 tour features four private homes and gardens and two historic churches, each architecturally unique but all capturing the rural beauty of the Northern Neck.

Bay Breeze Farm (2553 Ocran Road, White Stone) overlooks Dymer Creek on the Chesapeake Bay. Built in 1922 by Joseph F. Bellows for his daughter, Fannie B Hawthorne and her husband, T.T. Hawthorne, the house and property have been undergoing ten years of renovations by its third generation owners. Dr. and Mrs. M. Stephen Kramer, owners


Saratoga (11545 Mary Ball Road, Lancaster) is a Federal style one and half story house. It was built in 1843 by Hilkiah Ball, Jr. on the 202 acre parcel he inherited from his father in 1832. Many people in the area have told of their relatives being married in the parlor at Saratoga. Mr. and Mrs. B. Scott McCord,owners


Treetops (219 Red Fox Lane, Weems) on the eastern branch of the Corrotoman was designed by celebrated Virginia architect Milton Grigg. Grigg is best known for his restoration work in Colonial Williamsburg and at Monticello. Grigg worked as a modernist with the Jeffersonian tradition. Built in 1974, the home is a prime example of Grigg’s later work. Mr. Fred Comer and Mr. Mark Manoff, owners


Verville (124 West Point Road, Merry Point) was part of a Royal Patent signed by Governor Berkeley in 1663. Consisting of 2,500 acres, the estate embraced nearly the entire peninsula formed by the two branches of the Corrotoman River. One of four sons of Thomas Carter, Henry Carter inherited the property on top of the hill and built the Pre-Georgian Colonial, one and half story brick structure in about 1725. Mr. Ammon G. Dunton, Jr., owner


White Stone Episcopal Methodist Church (118 Methodist Church Road, White Stone), one of the earliest churches in the area, has served this community for almost 200 years. It was included with White Marsh, St. Mary’s White Chapel, and Rehobeth Churches to form the Lancaster Circuit. Land was purchased for the church in 1819. However, it was not until 1873 that a deed was signed for a two acre tract adjoining the original tract for the purpose of constructing a new sanctuary. The Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library in Lancaster will be displaying a wedding dress and other accessories in the sanctuary. Most of these items are from the wedding of Edna Earl Sanders and Dr. Benjamin H.B. Hubbard, which took place in the church in January, 1898.


Historic White Marsh Church (11040 Mary Ball Road, Lancaster) was organized in 1972 and is among the earliest churches established in the area. On land given by Mr. George Brent, a frame meeting house was built first and located a little southwest of the current church. The name White Marsh was derived from the beautiful white flower, hibiscus, or marshmallow that grew in the marsh behind the church. On the day of the tour, the sanctuary will be adorned with period flower arrangements, and the Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library in Lancaster will be displaying traditional 19th century mourning attire and accessories gifted by local families.

Tickets: $35 pp.; Children 13 and older, full price; ages 6-12 half price; ages 5 and under, free of charge. Tickets may be purchased on tour day at any of the houses and churches open and at the Information Center, located at White Stone United Methodist Church, 118 Methodist Church Road, White Stone, VA 22578. For internet tickets, please access www.vagardenweek.org. Children younger than 17 must be accompanied by an adult.
Advance Tickets: $25 pp. Either online at www.vagardenweek.org or by my mail until April 17 Checks to be made payable to The Garden Club of the Northern Neck: Carol Hughes, P.O. Box 775 Irvington, VA 22480. Please send check with a stamped, self-addressed legal envelope. For questions, please contact Carol Hughes at weedarnock@yahoo.com. Tickets available locally until April 25th at the following locations: The Pedestal, Kilmarnock; The Dandelion, Irvington; and the Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library, Lancaster.
Not handicap accessible; not suitable for bus tours. Shuttles provided as needed. Wear comfortable, flat-soled shoes for walking. Please, no sharp- heeled shoes, cell phones, or photography (including cell phone images) inside the properties.
Box Lunches: Box lunches are $15 each and must be reserved before April 20th. Vegetarian lunches are available. Please make checks payable to White Stone United Methodist Church and send to Maxine Somervell, P.O. Box 153, White Stone, VA 22578. Contact (804) 435-3545 or maxontabbs@gmail.com for more information. Lunches may be picked up at White Stone United Methodist Church from 11:00am to 2:00 pm. Limited eat-in seating is available..
Refreshments: Complimentary refreshments are served at Bay Breeze Farm from 11:00am to 4:00pm.

Middlesex County:
Friday, April 29, 2016 • 10:00am - 4:oopm

The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula presents six Middlesex County riverfront properties under the theme Preservation, Restoration, and Conservation. Careful use of native plants and protected shorelines highlight the importance of protecting waterways in this scenic area of Virginia.
Kelly House (16966 General Puller Highway, Deltaville) The house is a typical Virginia planter’s home of the 1840s. The addition of a rear kitchen, sunroom and brick terrace utilizing old flooring and local bricks is framed by landscaped grounds with crepe myrtle trees and boxwoods. After more than 75 years of neglect and decline, the home was refurbished in 2006 by descendants of William Henry and Nancy Mitchell Hancock Kelly. Mr. and Mrs. Paige Basheer, owners.

Woodport (352 Woodport Lane, Hartfield) Historic Woodport-on-the-Piankatank is an 18th century four-bedroom home located on the site of a Pre-Revolutionary War plantation. A large cannon ball, possibly from the War of 1812 or the Civil War, had been lodged in the riverfront exterior brick wall, but was removed by former owners. During the 1970s renovation, a cannon ball was found on the property and replaced in the indenture. Eight feet of water and a protected harbor in front of the home allowed lumber schooners traveling to Baltimore to moor there. Thus the home acquired the name “Woodport.” James and Beverly Barnhardt, owners.


Lent Home in Mariners Woods (379 Sunset Vista, Hartfield) Nestled on the Piankatank River, multiple informal gardens and a pristine salt marsh with navigable creek comprise this 7.5-acre property. The home is surrounded by winding paths with relaxed woodland and riverside gardens of native trees, flowering shrubs and bog gardens as well as perennial gardens. Over 15,000 bulbs are planted throughout the landscape. A thriving beehive along one of the marsh nature paths is residence to thousands of little pollinators. Several trenches, gun pits and ground impressions believed to be from the Civil War era lie peacefully around the barn and woodland paths. Opening for the first time. Sandi and Tim Lent, owners.


Wilton House (1425 Twiggs Ferry Road, Hartfield) Wilton, completed in 1763, is a study in Georgian elegance and simplicity, and, today, as a survivor, it can boast commanding authenticity. It retains much of its early historic fabric and is virtually unchanged in its external footprint and interior layout. Original heart-pine floors – all in unvarnished condition – adorn six of its eight rooms. Early paint surfaces abound. It is furnished with period American and English antiques, numerous “turkiye” rugs, and an array of American and European paintings. The slave cabin to the east of the main house dates from the 1840s. Stephen M. Foster, owner.


Foley Home (356 North Shore Road, Locust Hill) This two-story contemporary home is situated high on a bluff overlooking the Rappahannock River. Local artists created the stained glass door and windows, as well as numerous works of art throughout the home. The main house boasts oversized windows with a view of the Rappahannock River towards Urbanna and the Chesapeake Bay. Its open floor plan creates light filled rooms filled with casual furnishings. The pool house provides an eclectic mix of neon signs, souvenirs and memorabilia. The gardens include native, annual and perennial specimens and statuary. Bea and Tom Foley, owner.


W.H. Sandwich (131 Virginia Street, Urbanna) The “Old Customs House” built between 1754 and 1758 in what was the new town of Urbanna was the county seat and port of entry along Wormley’s Creek. The building was remodeled around 1805 and embellished with the current living-room woodwork. There is a formal English boxwood garden transplanted from Gunston Hall, the plantation home of George Mason. The home has been in the Montague family since 1934 and is in its fifth generation of use by the family. Bob Montague III and Bob and Patricia Montague IV, owners.

Gloucester-Mathews County
Saturday, April 23, 2016 • 10:00am - 5:oopm

When Gloucester and Mathews were founded in 1651 and 1791 respectively, they were blessed with beautiful waterways where colonists soon built their homes. As a consequence, today’s residents benefit from some very old historic homes as well as the ancient trees that were planted early on. The book Remarkable Trees of Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 2008) sought to register the most ancient and largest trees in the Commonwealth. Two of the listed trees are included on this year’s tour, as well as several others worthy of nomination. “Trees are poems that the earth writes upon the sky.” 
(Kahlil Gibran)
Heath Home Transportation is provided by shuttle from Brent & Becky’s Bulbs. (7900 Daffodil Lane). The Heaths moved into this house in 2015 from the one (still on the property) that they built with their own hands in the 1970s. Brent has been a collector for years; including a variety of fallen trees that he saved for the day he built his retirement home. The time has now come and visitors will be intrigued by color patterns in the flooring in this open-plan house. Though most of the house is wide open - kitchen, living room, bar, fireplace area - Becky and Brent each have their own spaces where they can close the doors. Don’t miss the garden on the roof! The house is guarded by a 100-year-old poplar tree. Brent and Becky Heath, owners


The River House (5750 Ware Neck Road, Ware Neck). Built in 2005, River House is an open, airy, light-filled home on a slightly different footprint, but on the same approximate water’s edge, as the home that Mrs. Bartley grew up in. There are two “man caves” where Mr. Bartley keeps some of his collections. Mr. Bartley has a museum-quality collection of Civil War relics and memorabilia; selected items will be on display The giant red maple in the front yard of River House is listed in Remarkable Trees of Virginia (page 125). It measures 19 feet around at the “waist.” Brownie and Ted Bartley, owners


Sweetwater (3053 North River Road, Cardinal). Sweetwater occupies 198 acres, with a mile of shoreline on the North River. The house is 9,100 square feet in the French Provincial style. There are also a guest cottage, a pool house, an airplane hangar and a four-car garage. In the main house there are five bedrooms, five full baths and two half baths. The Curtises have some very old trees with such presence that they have been given the names of famous generals. Do stop for a moment of rest by the koi pond. Complimentary refreshments will be served here 3:00pm to 5:00pm. Sherry and Andrew Curtis, owners.

General Information:
Tour Headquarters will be at Ware Church, 7825 John Clayton Memorial Hwy. in Gloucester. Ware Parish was founded about 1652 at another location; the current building dates from about 1718. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The walls of Flemish bond with glazed headers are three feet thick. There have been about 1,000 burials since the first in 1723. Today, this ancient burying place is a leafy haven imbued with beauty and serenity. A map of the trees will be available.
Tickets:
Tickets may be ordered in advance ($30) at www.vagardenweek.org, or by mail before April 11, 2016, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope with check payable to: GCG c/o Margaret Singleton, P.O. Box 13488, Gloucester, VA 23061. Tickets will be available until April 22 at Angelwing Stationers, Brent & Becky’s Bulbs in Gloucester and Mathews Visitor’s Center in Mathews. Check or cash only. Tickets and maps will be available at the tour headquarters, Ware Episcopal Church at 7820 John Clayton Hwy. (Route 14) in Gloucester, on the day of the tour only for $35 each. Guidebooks will be available at all ticket venues. Consult the guide for other points of interest.
Box Lunches:
Box lunches will be available at: (1) Nuttall’s Country Store, 6495 Ware Neck Road, Ware Neck, VA 23178 between 11 and 1:30. Reserve at Nuttallstore@gmail.com or call (804) 693-3067 by April 12, 2016. Lunch will also be available at (2) Creekside Catering. Reserve Creekside by emailing Creekside01@yahoo.com by April 19, 2016. A Creekside Catering food truck and catering tent will be available at Brent & Becky’s Bulbs on tour day, 11:00am to 2:00pm
Special Event:
Nancy Ross Hugo, author of Remarkable Trees of Virginia, will be at Brent and Becky’s Bulbs from 11:00am to 2:00pm for a book signing. Her other books will also be available for purchase: Seeing Trees, Trees Up Close, Earth Works, and Windowsill Art. The Arranger’s Market (the arrangersmarket.com), which specializes in hard-to-find, easy-to-use vases and other arranging equipment, will also be open in the Chesapeake Bay Room from 11:00am to 3:00pm. For more information see the website www.vagardenweek.org.


Wednesday, April 27, 2016 •10:00am - 5:oopm


The Garden Club of the Northern Neck presents “Following Country Roads in Lancaster County” as part of the Garden Club of Virginia’s Historic Garden Week. Lancaster County, the southernmost county of the Northern Neck of Virginia, is a land of rivers, creeks, and coves, all feeding into the mighty Chesapeake Bay. The county’s heritage is rich in farming and water industries. Seldom in view, many lovely homes are tucked away among the woodlands or along meandering roads, surrounded by lush farmland, or nestled near the water’s edge. The 2016 tour features four private homes and gardens and two historic churches, each architecturally unique but all capturing the rural beauty of the Northern Neck.

Bay Breeze Farm (2553 Ocran Road, White Stone) overlooks Dymer Creek on the Chesapeake Bay. Built in 1922 by Joseph F. Bellows for his daughter, Fannie B Hawthorne and her husband, T.T. Hawthorne, the house and property have been undergoing ten years of renovations by its third generation owners. Dr. and Mrs. M. Stephen Kramer, owners


Saratoga (11545 Mary Ball Road, Lancaster) is a Federal style one and half story house. It was built in 1843 by Hilkiah Ball, Jr. on the 202 acre parcel he inherited from his father in 1832. Many people in the area have told of their relatives being married in the parlor at Saratoga. Mr. and Mrs. B. Scott McCord,owners


Treetops (219 Red Fox Lane, Weems) on the eastern branch of the Corrotoman was designed by celebrated Virginia architect Milton Grigg. Grigg is best known for his restoration work in Colonial Williamsburg and at Monticello. Grigg worked as a modernist with the Jeffersonian tradition. Built in 1974, the home is a prime example of Grigg’s later work. Mr. Fred Comer and Mr. Mark Manoff, owners


Verville (124 West Point Road, Merry Point) was part of a Royal Patent signed by Governor Berkeley in 1663. Consisting of 2,500 acres, the estate embraced nearly the entire peninsula formed by the two branches of the Corrotoman River. One of four sons of Thomas Carter, Henry Carter inherited the property on top of the hill and built the Pre-Georgian Colonial, one and half story brick structure in about 1725. Mr. Ammon G. Dunton, Jr., owner


White Stone Episcopal Methodist Church (118 Methodist Church Road, White Stone), one of the earliest churches in the area, has served this community for almost 200 years. It was included with White Marsh, St. Mary’s White Chapel, and Rehobeth Churches to form the Lancaster Circuit. Land was purchased for the church in 1819. However, it was not until 1873 that a deed was signed for a two acre tract adjoining the original tract for the purpose of constructing a new sanctuary. The Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library in Lancaster will be displaying a wedding dress and other accessories in the sanctuary. Most of these items are from the wedding of Edna Earl Sanders and Dr. Benjamin H.B. Hubbard, which took place in the church in January, 1898.


Historic White Marsh Church (11040 Mary Ball Road, Lancaster) was organized in 1972 and is among the earliest churches established in the area. On land given by Mr. George Brent, a frame meeting house was built first and located a little southwest of the current church. The name White Marsh was derived from the beautiful white flower, hibiscus, or marshmallow that grew in the marsh behind the church. On the day of the tour, the sanctuary will be adorned with period flower arrangements, and the Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library in Lancaster will be displaying traditional 19th century mourning attire and accessories gifted by local families.

Tickets: $35 pp.; Children 13 and older, full price; ages 6-12 half price; ages 5 and under, free of charge. Tickets may be purchased on tour day at any of the houses and churches open and at the Information Center, located at White Stone United Methodist Church, 118 Methodist Church Road, White Stone, VA 22578. For internet tickets, please access www.vagardenweek.org. Children younger than 17 must be accompanied by an adult.
Advance Tickets: $25 pp. Either online at www.vagardenweek.org or by my mail until April 17 Checks to be made payable to The Garden Club of the Northern Neck: Carol Hughes, P.O. Box 775 Irvington, VA 22480. Please send check with a stamped, self-addressed legal envelope. For questions, please contact Carol Hughes at weedarnock@yahoo.com. Tickets available locally until April 25th at the following locations: The Pedestal, Kilmarnock; The Dandelion, Irvington; and the Mary Ball Washington Museum and Library, Lancaster.
Not handicap accessible; not suitable for bus tours. Shuttles provided as needed. Wear comfortable, flat-soled shoes for walking. Please, no sharp- heeled shoes, cell phones, or photography (including cell phone images) inside the properties.
Box Lunches: Box lunches are $15 each and must be reserved before April 20th. Vegetarian lunches are available. Please make checks payable to White Stone United Methodist Church and send to Maxine Somervell, P.O. Box 153, White Stone, VA 22578. Contact (804) 435-3545 or maxontabbs@gmail.com for more information. Lunches may be picked up at White Stone United Methodist Church from 11:00am to 2:00 pm. Limited eat-in seating is available..
Refreshments: Complimentary refreshments are served at Bay Breeze Farm from 11:00am to 4:00pm.

Middlesex County:
Friday, April 29, 2016 • 10:00am - 4:oopm

The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula presents six Middlesex County riverfront properties under the theme Preservation, Restoration, and Conservation. Careful use of native plants and protected shorelines highlight the importance of protecting waterways in this scenic area of Virginia.

Kelly House (16966 General Puller Highway, Deltaville) The house is a typical Virginia planter’s home of the 1840s. The addition of a rear kitchen, sunroom and brick terrace utilizing old flooring and local bricks is framed by landscaped grounds with crepe myrtle trees and boxwoods. After more than 75 years of neglect and decline, the home was refurbished in 2006 by descendants of William Henry and Nancy Mitchell Hancock Kelly. Mr. and Mrs. Paige Basheer, owners.

Woodport (352 Woodport Lane, Hartfield) Historic Woodport-on-the-Piankatank is an 18th century four-bedroom home located on the site of a Pre-Revolutionary War plantation. A large cannon ball, possibly from the War of 1812 or the Civil War, had been lodged in the riverfront exterior brick wall, but was removed by former owners. During the 1970s renovation, a cannon ball was found on the property and replaced in the indenture. Eight feet of water and a protected harbor in front of the home allowed lumber schooners traveling to Baltimore to moor there. Thus the home acquired the name “Woodport.” James and Beverly Barnhardt, owners.

Lent Home in Mariners Woods (379 Sunset Vista, Hartfield) Nestled on the Piankatank River, multiple informal gardens and a pristine salt marsh with navigable creek comprise this 7.5-acre property. The home is surrounded by winding paths with relaxed woodland and riverside gardens of native trees, flowering shrubs and bog gardens as well as perennial gardens. Over 15,000 bulbs are planted throughout the landscape. A thriving beehive along one of the marsh nature paths is residence to thousands of little pollinators. Several trenches, gun pits and ground impressions believed to be from the Civil War era lie peacefully around the barn and woodland paths. Opening for the first time. Sandi and Tim Lent, owners.


Wilton House (1425 Twiggs Ferry Road, Hartfield) Wilton, completed in 1763, is a study in Georgian elegance and simplicity, and, today, as a survivor, it can boast commanding authenticity. It retains much of its early historic fabric and is virtually unchanged in its external footprint and interior layout. Original heart-pine floors – all in unvarnished condition – adorn six of its eight rooms. Early paint surfaces abound. It is furnished with period American and English antiques, numerous “turkiye” rugs, and an array of American and European paintings. The slave cabin to the east of the main house dates from the 1840s. Stephen M. Foster, owner.


Foley Home (356 North Shore Road, Locust Hill) This two-story contemporary home is situated high on a bluff overlooking the Rappahannock River. Local artists created the stained glass door and windows, as well as numerous works of art throughout the home. The main house boasts oversized windows with a view of the Rappahannock River towards Urbanna and the Chesapeake Bay. Its open floor plan creates light filled rooms filled with casual furnishings. The pool house provides an eclectic mix of neon signs, souvenirs and memorabilia. The gardens include native, annual and perennial specimens and statuary. Bea and Tom Foley, owner.


W.H. Sandwich (131 Virginia Street, Urbanna) The “Old Customs House” built between 1754 and 1758 in what was the new town of Urbanna was the county seat and port of entry along Wormley’s Creek. The building was remodeled around 1805 and embellished with the current living-room woodwork. There is a formal English boxwood garden transplanted from Gunston Hall, the plantation home of George Mason. The home has been in the Montague family since 1934 and is in its fifth generation of use by the family. Bob Montague III and Bob and Patricia Montague IV, owners.

Gloucester-Mathews County
Saturday, April 23, 2016 • 10:00am - 5:oopm

When Gloucester and Mathews were founded in 1651 and 1791 respectively, they were blessed with beautiful waterways where colonists soon built their homes. As a consequence, today’s residents benefit from some very old historic homes as well as the ancient trees that were planted early on. The book Remarkable Trees of Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 2008) sought to register the most ancient and largest trees in the Commonwealth. Two of the listed trees are included on this year’s tour, as well as several others worthy of nomination. “Trees are poems that the earth writes upon the sky.” 
(Kahlil Gibran)

Heath Home Transportation is provided by shuttle from Brent & Becky’s Bulbs. (7900 Daffodil Lane). The Heaths moved into this house in 2015 from the one (still on the property) that they built with their own hands in the 1970s. Brent has been a collector for years; including a variety of fallen trees that he saved for the day he built his retirement home. The time has now come and visitors will be intrigued by color patterns in the flooring in this open-plan house. Though most of the house is wide open - kitchen, living room, bar, fireplace area - Becky and Brent each have their own spaces where they can close the doors. Don’t miss the garden on the roof! The house is guarded by a 100-year-old poplar tree. Brent and Becky Heath, owners


The River House (5750 Ware Neck Road, Ware Neck). Built in 2005, River House is an open, airy, light-filled home on a slightly different footprint, but on the same approximate water’s edge, as the home that Mrs. Bartley grew up in. There are two “man caves” where Mr. Bartley keeps some of his collections. Mr. Bartley has a museum-quality collection of Civil War relics and memorabilia; selected items will be on display The giant red maple in the front yard of River House is listed in Remarkable Trees of Virginia (page 125). It measures 19 feet around at the “waist.” Brownie and Ted Bartley, owners


Sweetwater (3053 North River Road, Cardinal). Sweetwater occupies 198 acres, with a mile of shoreline on the North River. The house is 9,100 square feet in the French Provincial style. There are also a guest cottage, a pool house, an airplane hangar and a four-car garage. In the main house there are five bedrooms, five full baths and two half baths. The Curtises have some very old trees with such presence that they have been given the names of famous generals. Do stop for a moment of rest by the koi pond. Complimentary refreshments will be served here 3:00pm to 5:00pm. Sherry and Andrew Curtis, owners.

General Information:
Tour Headquarters will be at Ware Church, 7825 John Clayton Memorial Hwy. in Gloucester. Ware Parish was founded about 1652 at another location; the current building dates from about 1718. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The walls of Flemish bond with glazed headers are three feet thick. There have been about 1,000 burials since the first in 1723. Today, this ancient burying place is a leafy haven imbued with beauty and serenity. A map of the trees will be available.
Tickets:
Tickets may be ordered in advance ($30) at www.vagardenweek.org, or by mail before April 11, 2016, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope with check payable to: GCG c/o Margaret Singleton, P.O. Box 13488, Gloucester, VA 23061. Tickets will be available until April 22 at Angelwing Stationers, Brent & Becky’s Bulbs in Gloucester and Mathews Visitor’s Center in Mathews. Check or cash only. Tickets and maps will be available at the tour headquarters, Ware Episcopal Church at 7820 John Clayton Hwy. (Route 14) in Gloucester, on the day of the tour only for $35 each. Guidebooks will be available at all ticket venues. Consult the guide for other points of interest.
Box Lunches:
Box lunches will be available at: (1) Nuttall’s Country Store, 6495 Ware Neck Road, Ware Neck, VA 23178 between 11 and 1:30. Reserve at Nuttallstore@gmail.com or call (804) 693-3067 by April 12, 2016. Lunch will also be available at (2) Creekside Catering. Reserve Creekside by emailing Creekside01@yahoo.com by April 19, 2016. A Creekside Catering food truck and catering tent will be available at Brent & Becky’s Bulbs on tour day, 11:00am to 2:00pm
Special Event:
Nancy Ross Hugo, author of Remarkable Trees of Virginia, will be at Brent and Becky’s Bulbs from 11:00am to 2:00pm for a book signing. Her other books will also be available for purchase: Seeing Trees, Trees Up Close, Earth Works, and Windowsill Art. The Arranger’s Market (the arrangersmarket.com), which specializes in hard-to-find, easy-to-use vases and other arranging equipment, will also be open in the Chesapeake Bay Room from 11:00am to 3:00pm. For more information see the website www.vagardenweek.org.