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  Saturday, May 27, 2017  
   
 

 
Book Club

 

Books clubs can be an enjoyable way to connect with friends over lively conversations about good books. Here are some reads recommended by several area book clubs. The synopses were provided by author/publisher websites, Wikipedia or Amazon.com.

Reading Between the Wines

Reading Between the Wines is a group of 17 women from Essex County and the Northern Neck who love good books, good friends, good food and good wine!

Little Bee
Chris Cleave
 
The publishers of Chris Cleave’s new novel “don’t want to spoil” the story by revealing too much about it, and there’s good reason not to tell too much about the plot’s pivot point. All you should know going in to Little Bee is that what happens on the beach is brutal, and that it braids the fates of a 16-year-old Nigerian orphan (who calls herself Little Bee) and a well-off British couple—journalists trying to repair their strained marriage with a free holiday—who should have stayed behind their resort’s walls. The tide of that event carries Little Bee back to their world, which she claims she couldn’t explain to the girls from her village because they’d have no context for its abundance and calm. But she shows us the infinite rifts in a globalized world, where any distance can be crossed in a day—with the right papers—and “no one likes each other, but everyone likes U2.” Where you have to give up the safety you’d assumed as your birthright if you decide to save the girl gazing at you through razor wire, left to the wolves of a failing state.

 

 

The Mimosa Book Club

The Mimosa Book Club has been meeting for over 15 years in King William County.  Each person recommends a book to read over a twelve month period and then leads the discussion over lunch.

The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris
David McCullough.

 
The Greater Journey is the enthralling, inspiring—and until now, untold—story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work.
After risking the hazardous journey across the Atlantic, these Americans embarked on a greater journey in the City of Light. Most had never left home, never experienced a different culture. None had any guarantee of success. That they achieved so much for themselves and their country profoundly altered American history. As David McCullough writes, “Not all pioneers went west.”